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Featured battle : Mons [1709]

Part of The War of the Spanish Succession

Date : 06 September 1709 - 20 October 1709

Only a token investment was initially made but this seige was responsible for bringing the French to battle at Malplaquet. The full investment started on the 20th September and by the 26th trenches had been opened and heavy mortars were in action. Wet weather and French sorties hampered Allied action. On the 1st October a 30 gun seige battery opened fire. Little by little the seige went ahead in the classic manner. The protective works of two gates were in Allied hands by the 17th and at midday on the 20th Grimaldi, the Governor, sought terms of capitulation. The garrison were allowed the honours of war and were permitted to leave without their cannon.

Featured image :

British military Series 3 Land Rover - MUR3_landrover2

British military Series 3 Land Rover - MUR3_landrover2

The classic British 4x4 of the 1970s with Sankey trailor

Gallery updated : 2016-02-21 17:33:57

Featured review :

Securing the Narrow |Seas. The Dover Patrol 1914-1918

Steve R. Dunn
There is quite a story about efforts in World War One to control that narrow strip of sea which separates Britain from the continent. If not the whole story this book gives a very good impression of covering most of it. From the lowest ranks with 'ordinary men doing extraordinary things' to the damaging petty jealousies and rivalries at the top of the Admiralty. It covers the failures in understanding that sea warfare was changing, failure in ships not really designed to fulfill the tasks asked of them. It illuminates the superhuman efforts and devotion to duty shown by the middle and lower ranks when they were asked to compensate for strategic inadequacies. The ships ranged from drifters taken in from the fishing fleet to monitors fitted with 15 inch guns. The tasks ranged from patrolling the anti-submarine boom, to bombarding enemy troops in Flanders, to the attacks on Zeebrugge and Ostend. Personal stories abound as in the sinking of H M S Sanda taking with it the oldest serving officer at sixty-seven and a signal boy of fifteen. In another incident on the death of a sailor he was found to have two wives, a problem for the pay-office!
The book is well written, thoroughly researched, well illustrated. While reading this book I occasional put it down because I was enjoying it so much I didn't want it end. It really is that good.
Seaforth Publishing. Pen and Sword Books Ltd., 2017

Reviewed : 2017-04-25 18:46:40